• Several content creators and entertainment personalities have joined the NFT craze. 

    People still struggle to understand NFTs, which continues to give the feeling that the majority who bet on them are looking more for speculation on the asset than for their benefit.

    World’s Famous NFTs

    Some of the most famous NFTs in the world are valued at millions of dollars and their main characters are becoming the new Mona Lisa of our time. 

    There are world-famous NFTs artists such as Beeple, a digital artist. He created a series of digital art called Everyday, where the artist created one piece daily. Beeple created an NFT by collecting the first 5 thousand and titled it; “Every day, the first 5,000 days.” This work was auctioned at Christie’s in March 2021 and reached 70 million dollars, becoming the most expensive NFT in history. 

    The Invisible Friends NFT collection created by Swedish artist Marcus Magnusson is becoming the most famous moving collectables in the digital world. Five thousand funny invisible friends with different characteristics, clothes and accessories.

    The Bored Ape Yacht Club collection has 10,000 NFTs with diverse characteristics, attributes and qualities, but one thing in common: they are all bored ape avatars. 

    And many other NFTs collections worth knowing about, are changing the blockchain scenario. 

    Source: https://invisiblefriends.io/

    What’s going on with these NFTs

    Until now, all the famous stories, books, movies, and characters that have made it in history go viral whenever you start to see all the merchandising. Disney opens a section at their park; you see T-shirts, mugs, posters, toys, and any merchandising you could imagine, and it all falls from a story. 

    Lately, we have spotted a slight change in how we commercialize a character or a story. We´ve seen the order of the events slightly shift, and we build our stories from an image instead of the other way around. 

    We´ve seen how gifs and emojis have developed their storyline; now, these new NFT characters are starting to do so. 

    We no longer need to write the story;  our image needs to be viral and the character in it.

    You can see it for yourself, how a bored ape with goofy glasses and a resting face has gone viral worldwide. 

    Source: The Bored Ape website

    The Bored Ape Fever

    Within the NFTs, the Bored Ape Yacht Club, or NFT monkeys, are possibly the best known. Many personalities have their monkey and highlight it on social media.

    But what’s next for the Bored Ape? 

    The possibility of turning the bored ape into a video game is one. It will be a play-to-earn game, a standard formula in recent times within the NFT world. The launch this past March 16 of ApeCoin, their cryptocurrency, with which they intend to enhance this title further. A style of games that consists of obtaining products with a monetary value, with the aim that we also add some money.

    Where are we going

    NFTs are no longer one only piece; they can be 100 different things or even a whole 360 campaign. NFTs are a new channel from which we can build a brand from scratch and a unique story to sell and commercialize. 

    It turns out that it is a central axis on which we can franchise and generate products from there. At Dogma, our fellow agency, one of the primary purposes is to manage and store the meta communities where these NFTs and the new 360 business model will live. 

    That is why the management of meta communities is crucial to be able to commercialize these new NFTs. 

  • Virtual Influencers are the new avatars that live on Instagram, TikTok, Facebook, Twitter, and different brands’ advertising campaigns. Over the last few years, virtual influencers have been a growing reality of internet interaction, and their influence is such that some of them have managed to collaborate with some of the world’s biggest brands.

    Although they are not real people, virtual influencers (an avatar created digitally) seek to create a community on social networks and show a lifestyle like anyone else.

    Brands collaborate with them to create advertising campaigns because of their continued growth and high engagement.

    NOT THE FIRST VIRTUAL INFLUENCER

    We tend to think that virtual influencers can separate us too much from reality when the truth is that we’ve been exposed to this fiction forever.

    We must remember that all the characters we’ve created through literature or the movies industry are virtual influencers.

    Imagine if Harry Potter was an influencer? How would his IG be? Which brands would he work with?

    Stories create characters for readers
    or viewers to interact with, fall in love or follow. They create communities and a lifestyle and even dictate trends; in other words, fictional characters were the first virtual influencers.

    44% of people have the same level of trust in a product when endorsed by a virtual influencer rather than a human influencer.

    WHAT ARE THE PROS

    The planned and implemented strategy behind each post or story of the virtual influencer encourages brands to work with virtual influencers because as well as being cheaper to work with, there is a reduced risk over working with a human influencer. The team behind each virtual influencer has full control of the narrative, deciding what brands they collaborate with, what the avatar should look like, what it publishes and its principles and values.

    Virtual Influencers could be less controversial than human influencers as avatars are less likely to receive negative comments, similarly for brands that use these influencers. We live in a cancel culture; anything an influencer says or does can have huge and lasting effects on an influential figure’s public perception so working with an influencer who aligns to the brand values is incredibly important.

    The virtual influencer content is highly customizable; there are endless possibilities for creative and seamless product integration. There is nowhere a virtual influencer cannot go and nothing they cannot do.

    Carlos Mendiola, associate director of the Department of Media and Digital Culture at Tec de Monterrey Campus Santa Fe, states that it may be irrelevant for brands if the influencer
    is an avatar. Brands are looking for someone who can engage with an audience and raise awareness about their products.

    Should brands create Virtual Influencers?

    Brands should be asking themselves whether they should start thinking about creating their avatar. This virtual character can represent them on social media and build a community like any other influencer.

    Today we can see quite a few brands that have already created a character in their likeness, a virtual influencer who shares all their values and aesthetics and intends to create a community.

    KFC’s fast-food brand transformed the iconic Colonel Sanders into a virtual avatar and used him for several campaigns as the new image. Like any other model, the new Colonel performs and acts within the brand’s values and creates a stronger bond with the KFC community.

    In South Asia, the fashion brand Puma launched a new campaign for their Puma Future Rider sneaker and created a virtual influencer for the campaign named Maya.

    Designed by UM Studio and Ensemble Worldwide, Maya’s personality evolves as her interests are built according to her interactions on social media, thanks to Artificial Intelligence.

    Prada is another example. They created
    their first virtual influencer named Candy
    to represent Prada’s aesthetic and values through their campaigns, building a stronger connection with their audience.

    These brands demonstrate that the future is within the virtual world; future generations, such as Gen Zs, believe in these new adaptations and feel comfortable creating a community around these virtual avatars.

  • “Avatars are a key building block for the future of personal identity in the Metaverse,”  said Adam Mosseri, Head of Instagram. 

    Said and done.

    Instagram has announced/released a new feature that is oriented to keep getting closer to the Metaverse. We are talking about its new avatars.

     The Metaverse is a big puzzle, still to be understood and defined, but these digital personas are the first part of the puzzle.

     Instagram Avatars are customizable 3D personas, and they can reproduce your physical features or reflect how you want to be perceived online.

    Adam Mosseri states that these avatars will be the virtual identity people will use to show up across the Metaverse – whether in an app built by Meta or any other company. 

    They are another forward step towards making the Metaverse a reality. 

    Who are these avatars?

    In the Metaverse, users will be able to interact with each other in a virtual environment. However, not everyone has access to a VR/ AR headset. Therefore, Meta has found its way of bringing a glimpse of Metaverse to its users in 3D avatars.

    These 3D avatars are functional, and users can customize them to be more aligned with their virtual identity. 

    Manish Chopra, Director and Head Partnerships at Meta, said, “Representations in the Metaverse should reflect the real world’s diversity. Avatars are just the first step toward enabling everyone to express themselves in their unique ways.”

    Source: Meta

    Why create your digital avatar?

    We see people comfortably talking to the camera, posing and feeling themselves, while we, on the other hand, can’t. Creating our avatar can help us confront this struggle and feel comfortable in front of the camera. Creating an avatar maximizes your creativity and freedom to be whomever you want. You can create a fictional character that does not depend on your physical barriers, just like when you are playing a video game, and you have to choose your skin. It encourages you to boost your creativity and develop new, breaking content beyond the physical world. 

     

    How can these avatars help your brand?

    The possibilities that an Instagram avatar will have for brands and advertisers is something that we will be able to assess in time. This inclusion of avatars has a lot to do with Meta’s attempt to enhance the Metaverse. Therefore, we can assume that Instagram avatar applications will follow this line. And trying to draw some conclusions, the avatar of a brand may become a communication channel for the brand with its customers. Suppose the avatar is sufficiently developed and capable of creating a loyal audience. In that case, it may replace some Instagrammers when promoting x-brand products or offering content. 

    However, it will be difficult for the avatar to supply the impartiality that flesh and blood Instagram is supposed to have when choosing what to tell us. 

    Everything that we choose to offer through the avatar of our brand will have to be measured because we run the risk that the public will finally assimilate our avatar as a mere customer service channel.





  • Today, May 5, we celebrate Linkedin´s 19th anniversary, the most extensive network globally. 

    Like many big ideas, LinkedIn started in the living room of co-founder Reid Hoffman. And its primary goal was and is to provide a space to help people build their work network—a place where anybody can find a job or find someone to work with. 

    Nineteen years later, Linkedin has 1.4 billion users, of which 84% use the platform to strengthen their professional network, 20% follow brands, and 11% read the news. 

    According to Statista, marketers state that they will use LinkedIn a 55% more as a social media platform for specific marketing strategies and to create a sense of community with their audience.

    We´ve also seen several Linkedin influencers, in other words, influential,  starting to have a tangible impact on their audience. These opinion leaders use Linkedin to create community and share their opinions and thoughts about life, work, business, and big ideas. 

    Who are these TOP 5 Linkedin Influencers?

    • Gretchen Rubin – 3 Million Followers

    Gretchen is an American author who has written several books, including The Four Tendencies and Better Than Before. Most of her work covers all things happiness, as happiness directly affects productivity.

    • Richard Branson – 19 million Followers

    Branson is the Founder of the Virgin Group, which now owns over 400 companies across various industries. He’s an absolute master at managing and growing companies.

    • Simon Sinek – 6 million Followers

    Simon is an author, motivational speaker, and optimist. He not only writes about productivity but also when it’s okay not to be productive. He wants to “inspire people to do what inspires them” which in turn makes them more productive

    • James Altucher – 1.2 million Followers 

    James looks for the most painful and embarrassing situations in his life. Then, he writes about them.

    • Sramana Mitra – 440.000 followers 

    She writes about entrepreneurship, and those building companies without gobs of VC cash. Owner of One million by One Million. 

     

    TOP 5 BRANDS

    1.Apple 

    16.6 million followers 

    2.Amazon 

    25 million followers 

    3.Nike 

    5 million followers 

    4.Netflix 

    8,5 million followers 

    5.Google 

    24 million followers

     

     

     

  • Virtual Influencers are the new avatars that live on Instagram, TikTok, Facebook, Twitter, and different brands’ advertising campaigns. Over the last few years, virtual influencers have been a growing reality of internet interaction, and their influence is such that some of them have managed to collaborate with large companies.

    Although they are not real people, virtual influencers (an avatar created digitally) seek to create a community on social networks and show a lifestyle like anyone else.

    Because of their continued growth and high engagement, large companies choose them to create advertising collaborations.

    Not the first virtual influencer

    We tend to think that virtual influencers can separate us too much from reality when the truth is that we’ve been exposed to this fiction forever. 

    We must remember that all the characters we’ve created through literature or the movies industry are virtual influencers. 

    Imagine if Harry Potter was an influencer? How would his IG be? Which brands would he work with? 

    Stories create characters for readers or viewers to interact with, fall in love or follow. They create communities and a lifestyle and even dictate trends; in other words, fictional characters were the first virtual influencers.

    Who are these new virtual influencers 

    Lil Miquela describes herself as a “19-year-old robot living in Los Angeles with 3 million followers.” Her publications reach more than 60 thousand likes. Among the brands that have decided to collaborate with her are MINI Cooper, Givenchy, Spotify, and Samsung. She has created a large community with whom she even shares parts of her life that have led her to existential crises. 

    Ronald F. Blawko, known as Blawko, is a self-proclaimed low-life who ident

    ifies as a robot man. He spends his time with his other virtual friends on IG or venting on Youtube to his subscribers.  

    Blawko has worked with brands such as Aliexpress. 

    KnoxFrost, another male virtual influencer with more than 600.000 followers on IG, has partnered with global organizations from the World Health Organization to Rock the Vote. Knox has also appeared in various media: Forbes, Business Insider, AdAge, Fortune, Adweek, Buzzfeed, Mashable, Dazed, Betches and CNN. 

    Mar.ia is the first Mexican virtual influencer. Her main focus is to raise awareness about different issues the world faces, such as climate change and other human issues such as gender equality.

    Shudu is a digital supermodel in her mid-to-late 20s from South Africa. Shudu advocates for the virtual human race; having worked with Cosmopolitan, Vogue, Balmain, and Smart Car, Shudu spends her time posing in premier, mystical shoot locations to display eye-popping fashion pieces. 

    What are the pros 

    The planned and implemented strategy behind each post or story of the virtual influencer encourages brands to work with virtual influencers as alongside being cheaper to work with, they also reduce the risks of working with a human influencer. The team behind each virtual influencer decides what the avatar should look like, what it publishes, its principles and values, and what brands they work with.

    Virtual Influencers could be less controversial than human influencers; these avatars are less likely to receive negative comments, similarly for brands that use these influencers.  We live in a cancel culture; anything an influencer says or does can have huge and lasting effects on an influential figure’s public perception. Working with an influencer who aligns to the brand values is monumental.

    The virtual influencer content is highly customizable; there are endless possibilities for creative and seamless product integration. There is nowhere a virtual influencer cannot go and nothing they cannot do.

    Carlos Mendiola, associate director of the Department of Media and Digital Culture at Tec de Monterrey Campus Santa Fe, states that it may be irrelevant for brands if the influencer is an avatar. Brands are looking for someone who can engage with an audience and raise awareness about their products. 

    Should brands create their virtual influencers?

    Brands should be asking themselves whether they should start thinking about creating their avatar. This virtual character can represent them on social media and build a community like any other influencer. 

    Today we can see quite a few brands that have already created a character in their likeness, a virtual influencer who shares all their values and aesthetics and intends to create a community. 

    KFC’s fast-food brand transformed the iconic Colonel Sanders into a virtual avatar and used him for several campaigns as the new image. Like any other model, the new Coronel performs and acts within the brand’s values and creates a stronger bond with the KFC community.  

    In South Asia, the fashion brand Puma launched a new campaign for their Puma Future Rider sneaker and created a virtual influencer for the campaign named Maya. Designed by UM Studio and Ensemble Worldwide, Maya’s personality evolves as her interests are built according to her interactions on social media, thanks to Artificial Intelligence.

    Prada is another perfect example of how creating your brand virtual influencer can help you control what they say, how they say it and where. Prada created their first virtual influencer named Candy to represent Prada’s aesthetic and values through their campaigns, building a stronger connection with their audience. 

    These brands are an example of how the future is within the virtual world; future generations, such as Gen Zs, believe in these new adaptations and feel comfortable creating a community around these virtual avatars. 

    Virtual reality is the new reality. 

  •  

    Source: @mahaha0

     

    The first-ever Metaverse Fashion Week took place in Decentraland from March 24th to the 27th. 

    Over 60 different fashion brands showcased more than 500 looks throughout the event. 

    From virtual runways, meets with designers to opening stores and afterparty events, the MVFW was one of the biggest game-changers for the fashion industry we have ever experienced. 

    The MVFW opened their audience from a small niche to a vast audience; anybody on Decentraland could assist since it was free.

    Visitors could buy NFTs of the fashion brands using cryptocurrency MANA’s platform through their digital wallets. They could either buy the look digitally or later transform it into physical. 

    The highlights 

    The MVFW started with London-based retailer Selfridges opening its flagship store with an immersive experience from Paco Rabanne + Victor Vasarely’s collection. 

    Estee Lauder launched NFT wearable, inspired by their famous serum Advanced Night Repair that users could claim and give their avatar a unique glowing by stepping in the virtual Advanced Night Repair “Little Brown Bottle”. 

    Tommy Hilfiger showcased its spring collection and opened a virtual store during the MVFW.

    The items for visitors to buy NFTs were the madras shirt for women and a unisex hoodie bearing the Hilfiger logo. Visitors could obtain physical versions of the items by redeeming the NFTs.

    But, the biggest highlight at the Metaverse Fashion week was the presence of Sophia, the world’s famous humanoid robot created by Hanson Robotic from Hong Kong. Inside Decentreland, visitors were encouraged to spot Sophia take a selfie with her and then share them on Twitter by #findingsophiatherobot.

    The new fashion influencers of the Metaverse

    One of the new world’s most exciting fields is what kind of marketing and content creation can brands offer in the Metaverse—knowing that more data will be available for advertisers and that targeting will be new. 

    Brands will have to create their digital twins and follow or dictate new trends in the Metaverse.

    Influencers have already started thinking about creating their avatars to work with brands in the Metaverse. Post for Rent has built a centre for digital influencers in Decentraland to become the “bridge” between the physical and virtual world.

    Brands like Prada, Puma and Yoox have already created their influencer avatars like Shudu and Lil Miquela. Prada’s new muse and influencer named Candy is an avatar dressed as Prada from head to toe, even adorned, and looks exactly like any other influencer.  

    The Metaverse gives influencers a whole new playing field, not only with their fans but also with other influencers. They can share brand experiences more efficiently, be connected and interact in the same space simultaneously. 

    However, this new virtual horizon for brands raises a big question for the world of influencer marketing. 

    Should influencers build their avatar replica for the Metaverse? Or should brands create a new separate and distinguished influencer world inside the Metaverse? 

     

     

     

  • “Just setting up my twittr”

    Date: March 22, 2022

    Category: Social Media

     

    Fifteen years ago, Twitter was born. However, this is not viral on Twitter. What’s viral today is the Korean singer Seulgi, the Boeing 737 crash in China and the Barcelona Club victory. The trending topics on Twitter are sometimes trivial, and others are not. It’s been part of Twitter’s identity from the first day it started and from the first-ever tweet, “Just setting up my twitrr,” Dorsey posted. 

    At first, Twitter was nothing more than an internal communication tool for Odeo, a small San Francisco podcast company. Above all, its first users dealt with the blandest everyday topics until August 3, 2006, when a small earthquake hit San Francisco. Soon the tweets began to talk about whether anyone had noticed it. One of the four Twitter founders, Biz Stone, recognized these “first” earthquake tweets as historical. They were a clear example of how informative and extensive Twitter was and how good of a tool it could be. 

    In 2008, after the Bombay attacks, we confirmed Twitter’s informative effectiveness; images and tweets informed traditional media of the last-minute news. In 2008, two years after that well-known first tweet (“Just Setting up my twttr”) by Jack Dorsey, Barack Obama won the elections, and Twitter was one of the key platforms of his campaign.

    The future of Twitter 

    The “fastest-growing conversation topic”, cryptocurrency, is at the top of the finance category. 

    “We’re witnessing an upswell of passionate crypto-enthusiasts with people on Twitter 3.2x more likely to consider investing in crypto than those not on Twitter,” wrote Jeff Melei, Twitter’s Director of Financial Services

    Twitter is taking a stand on cryptocurrency and NFTs, with the Bitcoin Lightning Network tipping feature and the NFT profile picture integration.

    Currently, the social media platform is also testing a new way to maximize your Spaces content by giving an option to create audio clips of up to 30 seconds directly from your audio broadcasts in the app. 

    The new clipping tool helps you create audio clips from a recorded Space, which can be shared via tweet, linking it to the entire recording.

    In the US, the platform is continuously evolving and improving the experience for its users. Twitter is working to offer a better experience to brands and consumers by opening the Twitter Shop shortly. Brands will be able to present up to 50 products to their followers in this space by just adding the “View shop” button to their profile. 

    This way, brands and users will be able to link their tweets to potential products and create a stronger bond through the platform.

    Brands & Twitter 

    Twitter has been in our lives for 15 years; we all know its essence and power, but we still need to remind ourselves why our brand should be on Twitter and how it should perform.

    Perhaps what distinguishes Twitter from the rest of the social networks is its spontaneity. 

    Unlike networks like Instagram or Facebook, where messages seem to be much more measured, users have the feeling that on Twitter, celebrities, politicians or companies express themselves as they like. 

    This may be due to the social network’s briefness on messages and the simplicity of other users interacting with it. In any case, this main feature is what brands must consider when communicating through it.

    We might all know the main helpful marketing tips we need to succeed on Twitter, but we should always keep them in our minds. 

    • Develop your voice: 

    You need to develop an authentic voice to help your brand stand out from the noise. Show your personality, be human, be original and always spell correctly; there is no edit button. A well-known brand that has managed to define its brand voice is Wendy’s; they are capable of joking around trends and life news without ever leaving their spirit. 

    “We like our tweets the way we like our fries: hot, crispy, and better than anyone expects from a fast-food restaurant.” @Wendys. 

    • Be a hashtag pro: 

    Most social media platforms have the hashtag feature, but Twitter was the first to use it. So be a pro of it. Tweets with appropriate hashtags get double the engagement than without hashtags, but that doesn’t mean you can use all the possible ones you can imagine. It would help if you created branded hashtags and always used industry-related hashtags.  

    • Listen to your audience: 

    Twitter is one of the best platforms to spot your audience. Conversations are fluid and free; you can learn what Twitter users think about your brand and products and learn from other discussions. Use Twitter’s advanced search tool to find these conversations. Twitter is mainly about talking, but you need to listen too as a brand. 

     

  •  

    Pinterest, with 459 million monthly active users (MAUs) worldwide, is fifth in the list of the preferred social media platforms for purchasing, chosen by only 3% of the consumers. Meanwhile, with 1 billion MAUs and 500 million users every day, Instagram is positioned as the second most preferred social eCommerce platform, chosen by 23% of surveyed consumers, and only behind Facebook. (Source: Statista).

    Pinterest is determined to transform its site into a 360 shopping destination.  Pinterest’s latest ambition is to grow online shopping and advertising by offering checkout functionality to customers. 

    Brands and advertisers will promote their products to users on its site. And users will have the chance to buy directly from Pinterest. The aim is to encourage customers to find inspiration and buy more items at once. 

    As we already mentioned in our latest report, Consumer Trends 2022by 2026, 60% of millennial and Gen Z consumers will prefer making purchases on social platforms over traditional digital commerce platforms, meaning that probably the next customers’ favorite store will be a social platform. 

    WHAT ARE THESE NEW FEATURES? 

    Users will complete an entire purchase on Pinterest without leaving the app at any time. 

    They will have access to a personal shopping page, called Your Shop, with all the creators and brands’ products. Your Shop is still a pre-release version for U.S users but will roll out nationwide later this year. Now users can save, pin, and buy all the products they desire from their board. 

    The “Shop” will automatically add shoppable products that users save and remind users of their favorite products.  

    On the other hand, brands will significantly impact their customers thanks to new features such as the “Merchant details” that showcase brand values. Or the Verified Merchant Program that helps users find vetted brands in Australia, Brazil, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Spain, and Switzerland and enhances brands with a “verified” badge. 

    WHY IS THIS A GAME-CHANGER FOR BRANDS?

    “People who use Pinterest weekly are 7x more likely to say it’s the most influential platform in their purchase journey, compared to social media platforms. That’s why, as of today, we’re dramatically expanding our suite of shopping solutions for advertisers,” said Jon Kaplan, Chief Revenue Officer at Pinterest. 

    Bigger carts than other platforms

    Pinterest notes that shoppers have 85% bigger carts than other platforms and spend twice as much per month. Customers scroll down endless products, brands and inspiration through Pinterest. Many of their shopping decisions come directly from the inspiration they find on Pinterest. So why not allow them to buy instantly from it? 

    An enhanced | fully integrated consumer experience 

    Previously, users would be redirected outside Pinterest to a merchant’s site to finish their purchase. Many users would follow through with the purchase but drop off when a new merchant page would pop up. 

    Pinterest’s new features are a game-changer; brands can start an ongoing relationship with their customers, develop different brand interactions and experiences and reach a vast audience focused on strictly social e-commerce shopping. 

     

  • Instagram’s new payment model is here 

    Date: February 9, 2022

    Category: Social Media

     

    Facebook-owned Instagram has announced a move that could allow creators to monetize their profiles by introducing a new monthly subscription button. 

    Until now creators have had to rely on displaying ads and sponsored content on their accounts, but with competition from social media sites such as TikTok, the platform has been trying to develop new features to stay relevant and entice new users.

    What exactly are users being paid for?

    The subscription feature will allow users to subscribe to creators’ accounts on Instagram for a monthly fee that could range from $0.99 to $9.99 a month. According to The Verge, users will have the option to subscribe on a monthly basis. At the moment this feature is limited to macro influencers in the US who can create a private version of their profile that’s only accessible to paying followers.

    What are Instagram subscriptions?

    There will be normal, free content that every follower can see and these profiles will also contain content that can be accessed for a small monthly payment. It’s a similar model to other platforms like Twitch or YouTube.

    As it’s the same subscription model as Facebook, it can be assumed that the format will be similar. This means that it may be limited to creators with more than 10,000 followers or more than 250 returning viewers on their streams. Similar to Facebook, it could also require more than 50,000 interactions with posts and 180,000 minutes of viewing.

    The three different subscriptions 

    Instagram offers three different options for accessing this exclusive content. One is Subscriber Lives, live videos to which subscribers have exclusive access. These differ from other live content because they are highlighted by a purple circle, as Instagram CEO Adam Mosseri confirms.

    Subscriber Stories, on the other hand, are stories that are only for users who have subscribed to these channels and who can interact with creators through the use of “stickers”.

    Finally, Subscriber Badges allow content creators to tag their subscribers with a purple icon when they comment on their posts in the feed.

    Generating revenue from posts would complement other existing content creation services, such as Instagram Collabs, a co-authoring format that allows you to share feed content and reels with another user in a single post.

    Instagram isn’t the only platform looking to try out new paid subscriptions. Twitter announced last year that it was working on a content creator feature called ‘Supper Fellow’ that will allow subscribers to receive exclusive content. Other social platforms such as YouTube, TikTok, or Pinterest are also joining this trend towards monetized content.

     

  • The future of live commerce

    Date: January 25, 2022

    Category: Uncategorized

    In an age where everything moves fast, live videos have been rapidly on the rise on social media. They first appeared on sites like Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram, but other platforms for this type of content are emerging.

    Live videos are very popular among Millennials and Gen Z and this trend also indicates the increasing importance of live e-commerce. To stay relevant, brands need to understand the value of live e-commerce and take advantage of it.

    Live shopping is happening on two fronts. One is on social media platforms such as Facebook, Tik Tok, Twitch, and Facebook, which make it easy for users to buy the products they see during video streams. And secondly, the brands themselves use the technology to take advantage of their infrastructure.

    Instagram Live:

    You can see how brands are using influencers in live streaming. Not only do influencers sell things, but businesses also get more brand awareness through live content. Live commerce on Instagram is based on the fact that an influencer’s job is to showcase a product via streaming.

    Almost 37% of adults in the US actively use the app.

    Live videos on Instagram help your brand discover and purchase new products by humanising your brand through a storytelling format.

    According to a 2020 Instagram Trends research study, 44% of people surveyed use Instagram to shop weekly, using features like shopping tags and the Shop tab, and 28% of their shopping activity. From browsing to searching to buying, Instagram is now a place where people consciously shop and get inspired.- Source: Instagram Trends 

    The social media that attracts more viewers, content creators, and brands more than ever before: Twitch

    The new social network Twitch is experiencing remarkable growth. With so many events cancelled due to COVID-19, Twitch saw a gap in the market, and its live content has now appealed to more than 41 million users in the US. 

    One example of brands using live content is Tyler, one of the most popular streamers on the platform. He broadcasts himself playing video games and has nearly 5 million followers around the world watching him. He earns more than $200,000 a month from Twitch ads and viewer subscriptions and is sponsored by huge brands such as Doritos and Nike.

    Twitch viewers can easily browse and buy the Twitch streamers’ products without leaving the stream.

    The big difference between Instagram Live and Twitch is that the Instagram audience values perfection, while fans on Twitch flock to the most imperfect streamers, but the truth is that in 10 hours of gaming marathons, no one can stay perfect.

    The appearance of a new app for live content

    New apps are appearing every day to join the live content trend. For example, the BEREAL app, which launched recently with a different proposition to the standard social media platform. BEREAL changes the context in which you post, showing us that when it comes to content creation, “natural” is best. The user can post a photo in the moment and place that the app sends a notification, and you only have two minutes to do it. The posted photo will be deleted the next time you upload a new photo.

    Live Commerce not only expands the monetisation opportunities for short video players but also the earning opportunities for creators, with so many social media platforms innovating in the live content space, we can expect it to continue to evolve in the future and for consumers to use it more, which is why brands should capitalise on this and continue to focus on live content creation.