• Virtual Influencers are the new avatars that live on Instagram, TikTok, Facebook, Twitter, and different brands’ advertising campaigns. Over the last few years, virtual influencers have been a growing reality of internet interaction, and their influence is such that some of them have managed to collaborate with some of the world’s biggest brands.

    Although they are not real people, virtual influencers (an avatar created digitally) seek to create a community on social networks and show a lifestyle like anyone else.

    Brands collaborate with them to create advertising campaigns because of their continued growth and high engagement.

    NOT THE FIRST VIRTUAL INFLUENCER

    We tend to think that virtual influencers can separate us too much from reality when the truth is that we’ve been exposed to this fiction forever.

    We must remember that all the characters we’ve created through literature or the movies industry are virtual influencers.

    Imagine if Harry Potter was an influencer? How would his IG be? Which brands would he work with?

    Stories create characters for readers
    or viewers to interact with, fall in love or follow. They create communities and a lifestyle and even dictate trends; in other words, fictional characters were the first virtual influencers.

    44% of people have the same level of trust in a product when endorsed by a virtual influencer rather than a human influencer.

    WHAT ARE THE PROS

    The planned and implemented strategy behind each post or story of the virtual influencer encourages brands to work with virtual influencers because as well as being cheaper to work with, there is a reduced risk over working with a human influencer. The team behind each virtual influencer has full control of the narrative, deciding what brands they collaborate with, what the avatar should look like, what it publishes and its principles and values.

    Virtual Influencers could be less controversial than human influencers as avatars are less likely to receive negative comments, similarly for brands that use these influencers. We live in a cancel culture; anything an influencer says or does can have huge and lasting effects on an influential figure’s public perception so working with an influencer who aligns to the brand values is incredibly important.

    The virtual influencer content is highly customizable; there are endless possibilities for creative and seamless product integration. There is nowhere a virtual influencer cannot go and nothing they cannot do.

    Carlos Mendiola, associate director of the Department of Media and Digital Culture at Tec de Monterrey Campus Santa Fe, states that it may be irrelevant for brands if the influencer
    is an avatar. Brands are looking for someone who can engage with an audience and raise awareness about their products.

    Should brands create Virtual Influencers?

    Brands should be asking themselves whether they should start thinking about creating their avatar. This virtual character can represent them on social media and build a community like any other influencer.

    Today we can see quite a few brands that have already created a character in their likeness, a virtual influencer who shares all their values and aesthetics and intends to create a community.

    KFC’s fast-food brand transformed the iconic Colonel Sanders into a virtual avatar and used him for several campaigns as the new image. Like any other model, the new Colonel performs and acts within the brand’s values and creates a stronger bond with the KFC community.

    In South Asia, the fashion brand Puma launched a new campaign for their Puma Future Rider sneaker and created a virtual influencer for the campaign named Maya.

    Designed by UM Studio and Ensemble Worldwide, Maya’s personality evolves as her interests are built according to her interactions on social media, thanks to Artificial Intelligence.

    Prada is another example. They created
    their first virtual influencer named Candy
    to represent Prada’s aesthetic and values through their campaigns, building a stronger connection with their audience.

    These brands demonstrate that the future is within the virtual world; future generations, such as Gen Zs, believe in these new adaptations and feel comfortable creating a community around these virtual avatars.

    Who are these new virtual influencers

    Lil Miquela

    Describes herself as a “19-year-old robot living in Los Angeles with 3 million followers.” Her publications reach more than 60 thousand likes. Among the brands that have decided to collaborate with her are MINI Cooper, Givenchy, Spotify, and Samsung. She has created a large community with whom she even shares parts of her life that have led her to existential crises.

    Ronald F. Blawko

    Known as Blawko, is a self-proclaimed low-life who identifies as a robot man. He spends his time with his other virtual friends on IG or venting on Youtube to his subscribers.

    Blawko has worked with brands such as Aliexpress.

    KnoxFrost

    Another male virtual influencer with more than 600.000 followers on IG, has partnered with global organisations from the World Health Organization to Rock the Vote. Knox has also appeared in various media: Forbes, Business Insider, AdAge, Fortune, Adweek, Buzzfeed, Mashable, Dazed, Betches and CNN.

    Mar.ia

    Is the first Mexican virtual influencer. Her main focus is to raise awareness about different issues the world faces, such as climate change and other human issues such as gender equality.

    Shudu

    Is a digital supermodel in her mid-to-late 20s from South Africa. Shudu advocates for the virtual human race; having worked with Cosmopolitan, Vogue, Balmain, and Smart Car, Shudu spends her time posing in premier, mystical shoot locations to display eye- popping fashion pieces.

  • “Avatars are a key building block for the future of personal identity in the Metaverse,”  said Adam Mosseri, Head of Instagram. 

    Said and done.

    Instagram has announced/released a new feature that is oriented to keep getting closer to the Metaverse. We are talking about its new avatars.

     The Metaverse is a big puzzle, still to be understood and defined, but these digital personas are the first part of the puzzle.

     Instagram Avatars are customizable 3D personas, and they can reproduce your physical features or reflect how you want to be perceived online.

    Adam Mosseri states that these avatars will be the virtual identity people will use to show up across the Metaverse – whether in an app built by Meta or any other company. 

    They are another forward step towards making the Metaverse a reality. 

    Who are these avatars?

    In the Metaverse, users will be able to interact with each other in a virtual environment. However, not everyone has access to a VR/ AR headset. Therefore, Meta has found its way of bringing a glimpse of Metaverse to its users in 3D avatars.

    These 3D avatars are functional, and users can customize them to be more aligned with their virtual identity. 

    Manish Chopra, Director and Head Partnerships at Meta, said, “Representations in the Metaverse should reflect the real world’s diversity. Avatars are just the first step toward enabling everyone to express themselves in their unique ways.”

    Source: Meta

    Why create your digital avatar?

    We see people comfortably talking to the camera, posing and feeling themselves, while we, on the other hand, can’t. Creating our avatar can help us confront this struggle and feel comfortable in front of the camera. Creating an avatar maximizes your creativity and freedom to be whomever you want. You can create a fictional character that does not depend on your physical barriers, just like when you are playing a video game, and you have to choose your skin. It encourages you to boost your creativity and develop new, breaking content beyond the physical world. 

     

    How can these avatars help your brand?

    The possibilities that an Instagram avatar will have for brands and advertisers is something that we will be able to assess in time. This inclusion of avatars has a lot to do with Meta’s attempt to enhance the Metaverse. Therefore, we can assume that Instagram avatar applications will follow this line. And trying to draw some conclusions, the avatar of a brand may become a communication channel for the brand with its customers. Suppose the avatar is sufficiently developed and capable of creating a loyal audience. In that case, it may replace some Instagrammers when promoting x-brand products or offering content. 

    However, it will be difficult for the avatar to supply the impartiality that flesh and blood Instagram is supposed to have when choosing what to tell us. 

    Everything that we choose to offer through the avatar of our brand will have to be measured because we run the risk that the public will finally assimilate our avatar as a mere customer service channel.





  • Today, May 5, we celebrate Linkedin´s 19th anniversary, the most extensive network globally. 

    Like many big ideas, LinkedIn started in the living room of co-founder Reid Hoffman. And its primary goal was and is to provide a space to help people build their work network—a place where anybody can find a job or find someone to work with. 

    Nineteen years later, Linkedin has 1.4 billion users, of which 84% use the platform to strengthen their professional network, 20% follow brands, and 11% read the news. 

    According to Statista, marketers state that they will use LinkedIn a 55% more as a social media platform for specific marketing strategies and to create a sense of community with their audience.

    We´ve also seen several Linkedin influencers, in other words, influential,  starting to have a tangible impact on their audience. These opinion leaders use Linkedin to create community and share their opinions and thoughts about life, work, business, and big ideas. 

    Who are these TOP 5 Linkedin Influencers?

    • Gretchen Rubin – 3 Million Followers

    Gretchen is an American author who has written several books, including The Four Tendencies and Better Than Before. Most of her work covers all things happiness, as happiness directly affects productivity.

    • Richard Branson – 19 million Followers

    Branson is the Founder of the Virgin Group, which now owns over 400 companies across various industries. He’s an absolute master at managing and growing companies.

    • Simon Sinek – 6 million Followers

    Simon is an author, motivational speaker, and optimist. He not only writes about productivity but also when it’s okay not to be productive. He wants to “inspire people to do what inspires them” which in turn makes them more productive

    • James Altucher – 1.2 million Followers 

    James looks for the most painful and embarrassing situations in his life. Then, he writes about them.

    • Sramana Mitra – 440.000 followers 

    She writes about entrepreneurship, and those building companies without gobs of VC cash. Owner of One million by One Million. 

     

    TOP 5 BRANDS

    1.Apple 

    16.6 million followers 

    2.Amazon 

    25 million followers 

    3.Nike 

    5 million followers 

    4.Netflix 

    8,5 million followers 

    5.Google 

    24 million followers

     

     

     

  • Virtual Influencers are the new avatars that live on Instagram, TikTok, Facebook, Twitter, and different brands’ advertising campaigns. Over the last few years, virtual influencers have been a growing reality of internet interaction, and their influence is such that some of them have managed to collaborate with large companies.

    Although they are not real people, virtual influencers (an avatar created digitally) seek to create a community on social networks and show a lifestyle like anyone else.

    Because of their continued growth and high engagement, large companies choose them to create advertising collaborations.

    Not the first virtual influencer

    We tend to think that virtual influencers can separate us too much from reality when the truth is that we’ve been exposed to this fiction forever. 

    We must remember that all the characters we’ve created through literature or the movies industry are virtual influencers. 

    Imagine if Harry Potter was an influencer? How would his IG be? Which brands would he work with? 

    Stories create characters for readers or viewers to interact with, fall in love or follow. They create communities and a lifestyle and even dictate trends; in other words, fictional characters were the first virtual influencers.

    Who are these new virtual influencers 

    Lil Miquela describes herself as a “19-year-old robot living in Los Angeles with 3 million followers.” Her publications reach more than 60 thousand likes. Among the brands that have decided to collaborate with her are MINI Cooper, Givenchy, Spotify, and Samsung. She has created a large community with whom she even shares parts of her life that have led her to existential crises. 

    Ronald F. Blawko, known as Blawko, is a self-proclaimed low-life who ident

    ifies as a robot man. He spends his time with his other virtual friends on IG or venting on Youtube to his subscribers.  

    Blawko has worked with brands such as Aliexpress. 

    KnoxFrost, another male virtual influencer with more than 600.000 followers on IG, has partnered with global organizations from the World Health Organization to Rock the Vote. Knox has also appeared in various media: Forbes, Business Insider, AdAge, Fortune, Adweek, Buzzfeed, Mashable, Dazed, Betches and CNN. 

    Mar.ia is the first Mexican virtual influencer. Her main focus is to raise awareness about different issues the world faces, such as climate change and other human issues such as gender equality.

    Shudu is a digital supermodel in her mid-to-late 20s from South Africa. Shudu advocates for the virtual human race; having worked with Cosmopolitan, Vogue, Balmain, and Smart Car, Shudu spends her time posing in premier, mystical shoot locations to display eye-popping fashion pieces. 

    What are the pros 

    The planned and implemented strategy behind each post or story of the virtual influencer encourages brands to work with virtual influencers as alongside being cheaper to work with, they also reduce the risks of working with a human influencer. The team behind each virtual influencer decides what the avatar should look like, what it publishes, its principles and values, and what brands they work with.

    Virtual Influencers could be less controversial than human influencers; these avatars are less likely to receive negative comments, similarly for brands that use these influencers.  We live in a cancel culture; anything an influencer says or does can have huge and lasting effects on an influential figure’s public perception. Working with an influencer who aligns to the brand values is monumental.

    The virtual influencer content is highly customizable; there are endless possibilities for creative and seamless product integration. There is nowhere a virtual influencer cannot go and nothing they cannot do.

    Carlos Mendiola, associate director of the Department of Media and Digital Culture at Tec de Monterrey Campus Santa Fe, states that it may be irrelevant for brands if the influencer is an avatar. Brands are looking for someone who can engage with an audience and raise awareness about their products. 

    Should brands create their virtual influencers?

    Brands should be asking themselves whether they should start thinking about creating their avatar. This virtual character can represent them on social media and build a community like any other influencer. 

    Today we can see quite a few brands that have already created a character in their likeness, a virtual influencer who shares all their values and aesthetics and intends to create a community. 

    KFC’s fast-food brand transformed the iconic Colonel Sanders into a virtual avatar and used him for several campaigns as the new image. Like any other model, the new Coronel performs and acts within the brand’s values and creates a stronger bond with the KFC community.  

    In South Asia, the fashion brand Puma launched a new campaign for their Puma Future Rider sneaker and created a virtual influencer for the campaign named Maya. Designed by UM Studio and Ensemble Worldwide, Maya’s personality evolves as her interests are built according to her interactions on social media, thanks to Artificial Intelligence.

    Prada is another perfect example of how creating your brand virtual influencer can help you control what they say, how they say it and where. Prada created their first virtual influencer named Candy to represent Prada’s aesthetic and values through their campaigns, building a stronger connection with their audience. 

    These brands are an example of how the future is within the virtual world; future generations, such as Gen Zs, believe in these new adaptations and feel comfortable creating a community around these virtual avatars. 

    Virtual reality is the new reality. 

  •  

    Source: @mahaha0

     

    The first-ever Metaverse Fashion Week took place in Decentraland from March 24th to the 27th. 

    Over 60 different fashion brands showcased more than 500 looks throughout the event. 

    From virtual runways, meets with designers to opening stores and afterparty events, the MVFW was one of the biggest game-changers for the fashion industry we have ever experienced. 

    The MVFW opened their audience from a small niche to a vast audience; anybody on Decentraland could assist since it was free.

    Visitors could buy NFTs of the fashion brands using cryptocurrency MANA’s platform through their digital wallets. They could either buy the look digitally or later transform it into physical. 

    The highlights 

    The MVFW started with London-based retailer Selfridges opening its flagship store with an immersive experience from Paco Rabanne + Victor Vasarely’s collection. 

    Estee Lauder launched NFT wearable, inspired by their famous serum Advanced Night Repair that users could claim and give their avatar a unique glowing by stepping in the virtual Advanced Night Repair “Little Brown Bottle”. 

    Tommy Hilfiger showcased its spring collection and opened a virtual store during the MVFW.

    The items for visitors to buy NFTs were the madras shirt for women and a unisex hoodie bearing the Hilfiger logo. Visitors could obtain physical versions of the items by redeeming the NFTs.

    But, the biggest highlight at the Metaverse Fashion week was the presence of Sophia, the world’s famous humanoid robot created by Hanson Robotic from Hong Kong. Inside Decentreland, visitors were encouraged to spot Sophia take a selfie with her and then share them on Twitter by #findingsophiatherobot.

    The new fashion influencers of the Metaverse

    One of the new world’s most exciting fields is what kind of marketing and content creation can brands offer in the Metaverse—knowing that more data will be available for advertisers and that targeting will be new. 

    Brands will have to create their digital twins and follow or dictate new trends in the Metaverse.

    Influencers have already started thinking about creating their avatars to work with brands in the Metaverse. Post for Rent has built a centre for digital influencers in Decentraland to become the “bridge” between the physical and virtual world.

    Brands like Prada, Puma and Yoox have already created their influencer avatars like Shudu and Lil Miquela. Prada’s new muse and influencer named Candy is an avatar dressed as Prada from head to toe, even adorned, and looks exactly like any other influencer.  

    The Metaverse gives influencers a whole new playing field, not only with their fans but also with other influencers. They can share brand experiences more efficiently, be connected and interact in the same space simultaneously. 

    However, this new virtual horizon for brands raises a big question for the world of influencer marketing. 

    Should influencers build their avatar replica for the Metaverse? Or should brands create a new separate and distinguished influencer world inside the Metaverse? 

     

     

     

  • Big brands and influencer marketing

    Just like brands that have yet to make themselves known, large companies, although already established, need to remain top of mind for consumers, adapting to new forms of advertising and marketing as they emerge and evolve.

    This is why, as we mentioned previously in another of our articles, the importance of keeping up to date with Advocacy Marketing and, specifically, Influencer Marketing, is essential in the world of advertising.

    Influencer Marketing continues to be one of the most effective ways of reaching the target market for each product. Each profile offers unique characteristics that allow the brand to connect with a particular type of consumer.

    What is the need for a brand to collaborate with an influencer?

    Brands need to approach and connect with their audience in a subtle way, avoiding invasive marketing techniques and obsolete commercial messages. They also need to humanise their brand and present themselves as beneficial to their target audience.

    Consumers are better informed than ever before and they also care more about receiving real, honest and more personalised advertising than traditional marketing.

    Big brands have a reputation for being somewhat detached from the reality that surrounds them and having the help of profiles that humanise them is essential nowadays to carry out effective advertising.

    An influencer marketing campaign can provide everything that big brands have been losing over the years, the credibility of customers and potential customers, visibility in front of their target, loyalty and engagement generating a sense of community.

    Why is the figure of the influencer important?

    An influencer brings the experience of using the product, the personal touch to the content created and the charisma of a person that a neutral advertisement cannot provide to a brand.

    It is important to know how to choose the right profile for the campaign to be effective, which is why agencies specialised in influencer marketing are a key element in this type of campaign. 

    Using profiles that really generate engagement, knowing who has among their followers the target that the company is looking for and being able to create campaigns that follow the branding line of companies, especially large and consolidated companies, is essential to carry out an efficient campaign.

    We can help you

    At SamyRoad we are experts in influencer marketing campaigns and we have been working for years with big brands to help them to keep positioning themselves while maintaining the values that define their brand. We also provide, as part of Samy, proper expertise in Advocacy Marketing through our 360 grades solutions.

    If you want to know more, do not hesitate to contact us.

  • Gaming: Fortnite Switch

    Video games are everywhere. In the APP of your favourite clothing shop, which allows you to try on clothes with AR, in schools, in companies and in satisfaction surveys.

    Gaming is growing exponentially every year and occupies a large part of today’s popular culture on social networks. The gamer community also reaches a hard-to-reach target audience, young men belonging to generation Z and millennials.

    Today, gamification is extrapolated to virtually every aspect of life and now, those aspects of life are turning gaming into another form of marketing.

    Gaming & Fashion

    Major luxury clothing brands have jumped into the arms of entertainment technology to present their collections and exclusive collaborations in games with a strong presence on different platforms.

    Gucci presented its collection in the Sims4, Animal Crossing triumphed and Tommy Hilfiger decided to present an exclusive winter collection by creating its own island for people to visit, Balenciaga created its Fortnite skin and Burberry, taking advantage of the popularity of the Chinese game Honor Of Kings, carried out a virtual catwalk with the game’s characters as protagonists.

    Moreover, eSports are replacing classic sports in terms of popularity, with professional teams having partnerships with brands such as Armani, Adidas, Fila, etc.

    The new influencers:  streamers and gamers

    If we continue to focus on the fashion industry we find Willyrex’s collaborations in Spain with the Springfield brand, launching his own clothing collection. On an international level, the collection of Ninja, the most popular American streamer on an international level, with Adidas stands out without a doubt.

    In addition, professional LoL player Rekkles, a member of the G2 team, one of the most popular gamers today, has been chosen by Polo Ralph Lauren as one of the faces to advertise its Wimbledon line.

    The home of Ibai, the Spanish streamer with one of the most remarkable careers today, collaborates with so many brands that it’s almost impossible to keep up. Endesa, Dominos, Colacao, Grefusa, are just some of the big companies that have decided to support the group of streamers.

    Fortnite everywhere you look around

    The Fortnite phenomenon is related to absolutely all kinds of brands and collaborations.

    One of the most outstanding actions carried out during 2020 have been the concerts of international stars such as Marshmello, JBalvin or Travis Scott, which broke records, achieving 27 million viewers.

    In addition, another of Fortnite’s advantages are the exclusive skins, which allow users to customise their character. Many brands, especially those in the entertainment industry, have found an advantage in this, creating their own popular skins for users.

    Football teams, Marvel, Star Wars, DC Comics, TheGrefg, Ninja, Mashmello, are just some of the brands (and characters) that have their own skin or collection of skins within Fortnite, highlighting the popularity of the video game internationally and the importance of positioning themselves in front of it.

    Experts in digital marketing

    At Samy we are experts in digital marketing and we can help your brand to position itself in different ways within the gaming industry. From our agency Share, we have launched a whitepaper on the growing importance of the industry.

    In addition, SamyRoad, as experts in influencer marketing, can help you find the perfect campaign with industry-focused profiles.

    If you want to know more or are curious to see what we can do for you, don’t hesitate to contact us.

  •  

    Data metrics on Influencer Marketing

    Influencer campaigns generate profits, that is undeniable. Influencer actions generate 11x times more ROI than traditional marketing actions. Moreover, in addition to this, BrandManic states that, according to its data, up to 92% of people are willing to trust personal opinions about brands, even without knowing the person making the recommendation.

    But this is not the only data supporting the benefits of profiled campaigns. According to Postcron and Grou, 94% of brand marketing teams that have used influencers for their campaigns consider it an effective strategy and the retention rate of customers gained through recommendation is 37% higher.

    As with other types of marketing campaigns, knowing the right way to do it and knowing how to choose the right influencer is essential. But how do you know if your profiling campaign has been successful?

    The key lies in the ability to know how to read the numbers, to have the real data of the profiles and to find the one that best suits our needs.

    Choosing the right profile

    There are many types of influencers, so many that we dedicated an article on the subject in this blog. Depending on the campaign we want to launch, it will be necessary to have a specific profile, defined by its style, audience, number of followers, among other things.

    Although at first glance it does not seem too complicated a task, it is advisable to have expert help, as sometimes a profile can be considered as the perfect one for the presentation of a product, when in reality the target audience is among the followers of another type of influencer.

    One of the most effective ways to find out who is really talking about us and to discover if we have our target is through Social Listening. Research also helps to know the type of insights that are useful to generate the right content.

    Getting to know the influencer’s approximate figures

    Not everything is about the number of followers. There are many influencers who have a large number of followers but do not generate the desired engagement for our campaigns.

    Furthermore, depending on the action we want to carry out, our objective may be to reach a more niche audience, so the search for profiles with large numbers is not always the best.

    At SamyRoad we have our own tool for finding the right profiles, Shinebuzz, and we can find out the real effectiveness of these influencers and monitor the campaign from start to finish to find out the real efficiency of the campaign.

    Find out the real numbers of your campaign

    It is important to know the real interactions, views and impacts of the content generated during the campaign to really know if it has been effective. Influencer marketing must be, like traditional marketing, a marketing supported by data.

    To get to this type of information it is necessary to have help, through agencies or experts who are used to dealing with profiles, and also to understand how to read them.

    Need help with your influencer marketing campaign?

    At SamyRoad we have been working in influencer marketing for years, we have helped more than 200 brands and we have our own measurement and tracking tool to know the performance of different profiles, and to help you find the right ones.

    If you want to know more about the topic or how we can help you contact us.

  • Brand Advocate vs Influencer

    What are the differences between an advocate and an influencer? Can they complement each other? Can someone be both?

    The best way to define the difference between advocate and influencer is to understand that an influencer can be an advocate but an advocate is not exclusively an influencer.

    A brand advocate is a person, customer, employee or organisation that shares a quote, comment or review about a company through their networks (social media, word of mouth, email) with no other incentive than their love for the brand.

    What value can each of these advocates bring to your brand?

    A brand advocate or “brand ambassador” represents your brand, shows their support and can even influence the purchasing decisions of their “followers”. Everyone has the ability to recommend your brand. They all generate new business.

    Customers

    Happy customers are great advocates and brand ambassadors

    The customer is the most important advocate to consider, as they can be your biggest supporter or your biggest fan. The real value provided by the visibility a customer gives you in networks is essential to generate brand advocacy.

    If they choose your product or services and love your company, they will go beyond all expectations when it comes to recommending the brand to family, friends, acquaintances and followers.

    Employees

    Happy employees are essential brand ambassadors

    It is essential for a brand to work on the wellbeing of its employees and to make them proud to be part of it, as the way a company treats its employees is a reflection of the company and has a real impact on its audience.

    Happy employees are the best ambassadors, they are passionate about where they work and show genuine love for the brand.

    Influencers

    Influencers as brand advocates

    If you’re on social media, chances are you’ve already seen a product on an influencer’s social network. Influencers can be, on the one hand, famous people with many followers on different social media platforms. On the other hand, niche influencers have fewer followers but have a big impact on their communities.

    If you want to know about the different types of influencers, just take a look at our article about it: Types of Influencers. Learn about all of them. Each influencer is different and, depending on what we are looking for for our product, one or another profile is recommended.

    As I mentioned before, influencers can be brand ambassadors, not only through influencer marketing, but also through their organic reviews. An influencer is like any other consumer, but with an exponentially larger audience, which presents an advantage when it comes to giving visibility to a brand. 

    An influencer does not only generate an advertisement, but also when content is perceived as such it can have a negative impact on consumers.

    As consumers evolve, connecting with them through influencers requires a constant evolution and requires a more personal and creative approach to give meaning to the message you want to convey.

    Want to know more about the Advocacy Marketing?

    At Samy, our alliance of agencies to which SamyRoad belongs, we are specialists in Brand Advocacy Marketing and influencer marketing. If you want to know more about it and how we can help your brand, do not hesitate to contact us.

  • Popular content for brands to post on Instagram

     

    Instagram is the king of social networks. There is still no doubt about this statement, as it is currently chosen by more than 1.2 billion users, the one that generates the most engagement and the one preferred by influencers, brands and users.

    On Instagram, 90% of users follow a brand, and shoppable posts can increase brand traffic by more than 2,600%. But, what content is most popular when it comes to brands?

    User Generated Content

    User Generated Content on Instagram

    UGC is very popular on social networks and Instagram is no exception. Brands can and should take advantage of content generated by users and customers. It’s real, honest content and shows the real consumer reception of your product.

    Behind-the-scenes Shots

    Behind-the-scenes shots is a popular content on Instagram

    People are curious by nature, a behind-the-scenes is always a good way to show how work is done and to show things never seen before by the user. Behind-the-scenes videos always generate great impact and interest no matter what you are talking about.

    Teaser Product

    Teaser your products

    Without a doubt, teaser content is a classic. Creating buzz by generating teaser posts to present a product is always a good idea. It increases engagement, people will want and try to find out what it is, especially if the teaser content is well done.

    Real-time Trends

    Keep it up with trends! Generating content following real-time trends is a must in social media. It is essential to have a good social listening strategy to know what is happening and always keep in mind the challenges and types of content that are popular at any given moment.

    Carousel Posts To improve your Information Sharing

    Data, tips or lists of information and curiosities are becoming more and more popular. People like to be informed in a quick way and this kind of information pills generate interest and curiosity. It is a very popular style of branded content.

    Memes are Taking Over

    Memes are popular content on Instagram

    Don’t be afraid of corporate memes! Although Twitter is the main social network for this humorous content, many are already taking up the format on Instagram. Branded content memes are becoming increasingly popular, but it is important to know how to use them correctly.

    Branded AR Filters

    Instagram filters never go out of fashion. They are easy to create and people like them, especially if they are absurd. A brand can create filters to promote items, that are just for fun or that serve to generate a challenge.The options are varied, you just have to be bold.

    Do you need help with your Instagram strategy?

    In SamyRoad we are experts in social media and influencer marketing, if you are curious to know more or want to know how we can help you, do not hesitate to contact us.