• The future of live commerce

    Date: January 25, 2022

    Category: Data & Metrics

    In an age where everything moves fast, live videos have been rapidly on the rise on social media. They first appeared on sites like Facebook, YouTube, and Instagram, but other platforms for this type of content are emerging.

    Live videos are very popular among Millennials and Gen Z and this trend also indicates the increasing importance of live e-commerce. To stay relevant, brands need to understand the value of live e-commerce and take advantage of it.

    Live shopping is happening on two fronts. One is on social media platforms such as Facebook, Tik Tok, Twitch, and Facebook, which make it easy for users to buy the products they see during video streams. And secondly, the brands themselves use the technology to take advantage of their infrastructure.

    Instagram Live:

    You can see how brands are using influencers in live streaming. Not only do influencers sell things, but businesses also get more brand awareness through live content. Live commerce on Instagram is based on the fact that an influencer’s job is to showcase a product via streaming.

    Almost 37% of adults in the US actively use the app.

    Live videos on Instagram help your brand discover and purchase new products by humanising your brand through a storytelling format.

    According to a 2020 Instagram Trends research study, 44% of people surveyed use Instagram to shop weekly, using features like shopping tags and the Shop tab, and 28% of their shopping activity. From browsing to searching to buying, Instagram is now a place where people consciously shop and get inspired.- Source: Instagram Trends 

    The social media that attracts more viewers, content creators, and brands more than ever before: Twitch

    The new social network Twitch is experiencing remarkable growth. With so many events cancelled due to COVID-19, Twitch saw a gap in the market, and its live content has now appealed to more than 41 million users in the US. 

    One example of brands using live content is Tyler, one of the most popular streamers on the platform. He broadcasts himself playing video games and has nearly 5 million followers around the world watching him. He earns more than $200,000 a month from Twitch ads and viewer subscriptions and is sponsored by huge brands such as Doritos and Nike.

    Twitch viewers can easily browse and buy the Twitch streamers’ products without leaving the stream.

    The big difference between Instagram Live and Twitch is that the Instagram audience values perfection, while fans on Twitch flock to the most imperfect streamers, but the truth is that in 10 hours of gaming marathons, no one can stay perfect.

    The appearance of a new app for live content

    New apps are appearing every day to join the live content trend. For example, the BEREAL app, which launched recently with a different proposition to the standard social media platform. BEREAL changes the context in which you post, showing us that when it comes to content creation, “natural” is best. The user can post a photo in the moment and place that the app sends a notification, and you only have two minutes to do it. The posted photo will be deleted the next time you upload a new photo.

    Live Commerce not only expands the monetisation opportunities for short video players but also the earning opportunities for creators, with so many social media platforms innovating in the live content space, we can expect it to continue to evolve in the future and for consumers to use it more, which is why brands should capitalise on this and continue to focus on live content creation.

  • Big Data: Myths vs reality

    Date: November 10, 2021

    Category: Data & Metrics

    The phenomenon of big data (understood as the ability to generate, record, process, analyze and obtain intelligent information from a huge amount of data) is marking a before and after in many aspects of life and could be equivalent to the revolution that led to the development of the Internet. No business area or segment of our life is going to be left out of the reach of big data and its exploitation, for example, by artificial intelligence. There are not a few authorized voices that defend that the result of this pandemic would have been different if they had had better data to analyze.

    Let’s get an idea of ​​the dimension of what we are talking about. Already in 2012 – practically 10 years ago – the giant IBM stated that if all the bytes of data that we generate annually were saved on CDs and we piled them up, we would create a great round-trip tower from the Earth to the Moon. Since then, the increase in data has been exponential.

    And it is that cities are full of sensors that collect weather information, traffic, financial transactions, our footprint on the Internet, in social networks, in purchases, in the consumption of content, in how we travel, our health … We are the users and citizens anonymous, those who leave an impressive data trail, not only of what we do, but also of what we think and even how we feel.

    Data as a bargaining chip

    Data is the new bargaining chip. They are the new power. A few years ago, terrorist groups from the East discovered the location of American military bases in the area from access to data generated by the wearables of American soldiers… and yet we shared our data without thinking twice.

    We hate constantly entering our password so we “log in” to “unknown” pages using our RRSS with applications such as Facebook or Google. As consumers and individuals, our lives – our preferences, passions and prejudices – are encapsulated in many terabytes of data, in the cloud: from our purchase history on Amazon, through what we like on Facebook and Instagram, to our opinions on Twitter, who are our friends or family, what we Google and what we ask Alexa or Siri.

    To capitalize on this opportunity from brands and companies, it is necessary to understand what big data is and what it is not and how we can apply it to our work. Next, we explore seven myths against as many realities around big data:

    Myth 1: EVERYONE USES IT

    The companies that are actually using their big data are very few. There are many top managers who are very interested in what it can offer, but when it comes down to it, they find it difficult to take the step towards a true digital transformation because of the ‘fear’ inherent to change. A strategic use of big data is not so widespread and, of course, much less in the field of communication and marketing.

    According to the report “Digital maturity in Spain. Data and Analytics ”of Indra’s subsidiary, Minsait, only 17% of the companies in our country had specialists in data analytics at the end of 2019.

    Myth 2: MORE DATA = BETTER DATA

    When people talk about big data, the conversation is usually about the amount of data and how this amount grows. Size and speed seem the most important. Size is not really that relevant because, in fact, a very small percentage of all available data is actually being used today.

    The most important thing is the quality of the data. What makes big data really useful are the so-called 5 V’s:

    • Volume – How much data do we have?
    • Variety – In what formats and with what variety of sources do we have the information?
    • Speed ​​- The speed at which new data is generated and added to existing data. Also the speed at which we can analyze them, if it is in real time, for example.
    • Veracity – The quality and veracity of the data we have. The degree of trust.
    • Value – The value they bring us through their analysis.

    Myth 3: YOU NEED A LOT OF MONEY

    It is true that large corporations and governments are investing large budgets in hardware, software, storage and professionals with skills in these fields but, with each passing day, big data technology is getting cheaper and also increasing the number of software options that allows the analysis of that data. Increasingly, the use of big data is democratizing, allowing all players – from the largest to SMEs – to start developing their data-driven strategies.

    Myth 4: LEADERS SUCCEED WITH TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGY

    It is obvious that tools and technology are important, but it is not what the success of big data is based on. Success with big data is based, above all, on a company structure and culture based on data analysis. Being “data-driven” is more important than having a lot of data. Studies show that the more “data-driven” companies are considered, the better their performance and results. Being successful with data also requires fostering a culture of experimentation.

    Myth 5: THIS IS ABOUT IT PEOPLE, MATHEMATICS, ENGINEERS, ANALYSTS …

    Everyone wants to “build big data”, but very few people know how to structure this cycle. And, above all, the big question is what for? What do we want to know?

    Big data in itself is worthless. The question is not how much data we can have or analyze, but what we want to analyze it for, what we want to know, and therefore what kind of data we will need. And to adequately answer this, although it may surprise us, it is often necessary to have minds with a more “humanist” profile than a “science” one: philosophers, sociologists, linguists …

    The skills needed to use big data are only 50% technical or statistical. The other 50% are logical thinking: knowing how to formulate good hypotheses based on what we know and what we want to discover. The challenge does not lie with the data, but with analytical thinking: the ability to recognize and solve problems using available information.

    Myth 6: BIG DATA IS THE NEW OIL

    Yes effectively. Despite the fact that the use of data to obtain information is nothing new at all. Like oil, data is useless in crude oil, it has to be refined and transformed into gasoline. Also big data is like a kilogram of flour or rice. They may have some value, but if we don’t know how to use them to make a recipe, they have no value because they are not edible.

    Myth 7: ALL DATA CAN BE ANALYZED

    There is a vast amount of data that cannot be tracked, measured, or analyzed. It is the so-called “dark social”: for example, all those visits to a website whose origin is unknown. Or all the occasions in which we share information via email or instant messaging such as WhatsApp, Snapchat or Messenger. This data traffic is difficult to measure and essentially nearly invisible to most analytics programs. Several studies assure that the “dark social” supposes, at least, 50% of the traffic of any web.

  • The Olympic Games Tokyo 2020

    A brief study on the Olympic Games

    The closing ceremony of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games took place on 8 August, an edition that has undoubtedly been marked by the current circumstances, but also by the weight of great moments and a large and active conversation on social networks.

    Thanks to social listening, we can measure those topics that have generated more negative or positive sentiment, those that have generated more interactions and mentions and how the audience has generally perceived the Olympic Games and its highlights.

    In this small general study, we have chosen to focus on the social network most focused on conversation, Twitter, to understand the real impact of many of the highlights of these Olympic Games. However, we have included general data from other networks in order to provide an overall picture.

    A unique kind of Games

    It is clear to everyone that the Games were a bit different. The pandemic has forced them to be held in 2021 instead of 2020, they have had no public, which entails losses for Japan, and yet they have been a games with a great presence in networks.

    Tokyo 2020 was also the first edition to feature competitions such as karate, rock climbing and skateboarding, ushering in an era in which the host country can define some of the competitions and dispense with others.

    Representation Matters

    Visibility in the face of discrimination, LGTBIQ+, the importance of mental health, etc. was undoubtedly one of the strongest points of these games, generating a very high level of conversation but also of great quality, thanks to the debates provided.

    The importance of talking about and raising awareness of these issues is incredibly well represented by the spike in conversation about mental health following the temporary withdrawal from the games of US favourite Simone Biles.

    The conversation about mental health generated a number of mentions, both negative and positive, which had an impact on the media, who echoed how pressure affects the mental health not only of elite athletes, but also of professionals and especially, considering the current social and economic situation, and how it affects young people.

    It is therefore remarkable that the term “mental health” is undoubtedly one of the most used terms at international level in relation to the Tokyo 2020 games. Moreover, in the graph below it is clear that 90% of the most used expressions are related to mental health and young women, especially young women of colour.

    Top most used keywords during the Olympic Games – connected to trends

    However, as mentioned above, mental health has not been the only key focus of these games. LGBT+ visibility was another of the most talked about, and celebrated, themes of the Tokyo games.

    When it comes to the LGBTIQ+ community in the world of Olympic sports, one of the most prominent voices is undoubtedly Tom Daley, the British trampoline jumper who has always been outspoken about his sexuality and vocal about discrimination against the group.

    His powerful statement “I am a gay man and also an Olympic champion ” has resonated strongly for all that it represents.

    Tom Daley after winning the gold medal

    In this sense, there have also been negative voices, especially when talking about trans athletes. However, many others showed their support for the trans community in general and the more knowledgeable ones reminded the masses that one of the medical measurements taken at the games is testosterone level test.

    In addition, there has been non-binary representation at these games, something that has also been criticised negatively by those who criticised transgender participation. However, what really stands out is the naturalness and positive visibility that this represents for millions of people.

    Non-binary representation at the Olympics by Quinn, a member of the Canadian team.

    The youngest Olympic Games

    Tokyo 2020 has also been marked by the number of competitors under the age of 18. Particularly noteworthy is the recently added skateboarding competition, where the podiums have been occupied by some of the youngest athletes in history.

    Rayssa Leal, Momiji Nishiya, Sky Brown, … There are many names of young athletes who have left their mark by their resilience, their sportsmanship, their professionalism and their camaraderie towards the representatives of other countries.

    Rayssa Leal cuando se hizo viral y ahora, como competidora olímpica (en translation)

    Olympians, the new influencers

    At the Olympic Games, contemporary fans are not only cheering on their country’s athletes, but also their influencers and social media stars. US Paralympic athlete Hunter Woodhall has 2.6 million followers on TikTok, US volleyball player April Ross is on the Cameo platform, and Tom Daley has documented his trip to Tokyo, where he just won a gold medal, for his 900,000 YouTube subscribers.

    Many athletes have gained international fans thanks to being discovered globally during the games, gaining thousands of followers overnight.

    Karate, skateboarding, sport climbing and surfing – all sports that resonate with a younger demographic – certainly helped drive traffic to TikTok. The women’s street skating podium winners were aged 13, 13 and 16, and the silver medallist, Brazil’s Rayssa Leal, has 3.4 million followers on TikTok, half of her 6.5 million followers on Instagram. 

    Filipina skateboarder Margielyn Didal posted a photo alongside Tony Hawk, widely regarded as the greatest skateboarder of all time, in which she added to Hawk’s running joke that people often failed to identify him in public places. When his post was interpreted by many as Didal not being able to recognise Hawk, Tony himself had to explain that it was all a joke.

    Erik Shoji, an American volleyball player, gained attention with food reviews on TikTok and tours from the athletes’ village, along with behind-the-scenes looks at the athlete’s experience. She didn’t take social media seriously until she opened a YouTube channel last year while battling COVID. 

    Australian canoeist Jessica Fox, on the other hand, rather than becoming famous for winning gold in canoe slalom or bronze in kayak slalom, rose to fame by posting a video on TikTok of someone using a condom to repair the nose of her boat. 

    Even the official Olympics profile has skyrocketed with more than three billion views of videos related to his #OlympicSpirit challenge. What’s more, the official TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Weibo accounts generated 3.7 billion interactions, reaching a combined total of 75 million followers.

    Millennials, GenZ, visibility and good vibes

    Another of the highlights is undoubtedly the good atmosphere, something that many have pointed out, the general good relationship between athletes, the gestures of solidarity, and the celebrations as friends of other people’s triumphs.

    The decision to share the gold medal between Qatar and Italy in the men’s high jump, the American swimmers celebrating the gold medal and world record of South African Schoenmaker as their own. There are many displays of sportsmanship and genuine camaraderie to be found at these games.

    Celebrating Schoenmaker’s world record

    Popular culture and the favourite shows of many have also made their way into the competitions. It is certainly a point that shows that the new generations are not afraid to show their passions and give a fun touch to the competition.

    Fans of “Avatar: the last airbender” were undoubtedly the most commented on, with the show having a very striking representation in both windsurfing and synchronised swimming, thanks to the representatives from both the Netherlands and the Mexican team.

    Kiran Badloe decided to decorate his hair with the characteristic blue arrow of the airbenders, the wind masters from the animated series Avatar, showing that the wind was on his side in the competition. Indeed it was, considering he won the gold medal in the RS:X category.

    Kiran Badloe showing his airbender style on Instagram

    Mexico’s synchronised swimming duo were not far behind, with swimmers Nuria Diosdado and Natalia Jimenez representing the four nations from the series in their costumes and routine, generating a huge buzz online.

    Another popular moment was the Sailor Moon-inspired rhythmic gymnastics routine and costume of the Uzbekistan team.

    The funniest trends

    Not all the moments at the Olympics are what can be described as wholesome, there have been new and returning memes, such as the face of the trampoline jumpers, which is now a classic.

    Within this, two points in particular have undoubtedly stood out, one that would explain the rise in followers of some of the athletes and another that shows why it is necessary to have empathy when talking about competition.

    Of the first, we can highlight how different countries have found the appeal of some of their competitors, awakening their interest in other locations, neighbouring or distant, which will surely end up defining their future trips, as soon as they can become real.

    One example is that of Spanish karateka Damian Quintero, who after his participation in the Olympics has reached 149,000 followers, filling his posts with comments in different languages. The athlete has aroused passions especially in Japan, gaining thousands of fans from that country.

    A new japanese fan showin her enthusiasm about spanish athlete Damian Quintero

    On the other side is Novak Djokovic. The Serb was asked about the pressure when competing, something that many related to Simone Biles’ temporary absence from the games, and he responded that pressure is positive and that you have to learn to manage it… only to have an outburst of anger days later during the match in which he was playing for the bronze medal.

    These unfortunate comments, in which he was referring to himself and not to the American, unleashed a barrage of memes on social networks.

    One example of Djokovic memes

    But this was not the only popular meme, Australian coach Dean Boxall’s celebration also went viral, as well as many other moments, here are some of them:

    Dean Boxall celebrating australian triumph

     

    Other of the most popular topics and memes

     

    Another of the most popular memes, to say the only thing in which someone can identify with an Olympic athlete. In this case, myopia.

    Data-driven research on the history of the Olympic Games

    Do you want to know more about data research and trends through the study of data? Our colleagues at SHARE Creative, one of the agencies part of the Samy ecosystem, have created an interesting article based on data extracted from the history of the Olympic Games, where you can see a bit more about how we work with this kind of information.

    You can take a look at it here. You can find out which countries have the most medals, in which sports a country clearly dominates, where the medallists with the most medals come from and much more, as an example of our data expertise.

    Want to learn more about our work?

    If you want to know more about how our innovation team works and why we are professionals in data and social listening you can contact us here.

     

    Fuentes: Social Listening realizado a través de Synthesio, Market Insider, USA Today, Twitter, GimmeSport, The Star
  •  

    Data metrics on Influencer Marketing

    Influencer campaigns generate profits, that is undeniable. Influencer actions generate 11x times more ROI than traditional marketing actions. Moreover, in addition to this, BrandManic states that, according to its data, up to 92% of people are willing to trust personal opinions about brands, even without knowing the person making the recommendation.

    But this is not the only data supporting the benefits of profiled campaigns. According to Postcron and Grou, 94% of brand marketing teams that have used influencers for their campaigns consider it an effective strategy and the retention rate of customers gained through recommendation is 37% higher.

    As with other types of marketing campaigns, knowing the right way to do it and knowing how to choose the right influencer is essential. But how do you know if your profiling campaign has been successful?

    The key lies in the ability to know how to read the numbers, to have the real data of the profiles and to find the one that best suits our needs.

    Choosing the right profile

    There are many types of influencers, so many that we dedicated an article on the subject in this blog. Depending on the campaign we want to launch, it will be necessary to have a specific profile, defined by its style, audience, number of followers, among other things.

    Although at first glance it does not seem too complicated a task, it is advisable to have expert help, as sometimes a profile can be considered as the perfect one for the presentation of a product, when in reality the target audience is among the followers of another type of influencer.

    One of the most effective ways to find out who is really talking about us and to discover if we have our target is through Social Listening. Research also helps to know the type of insights that are useful to generate the right content.

    Getting to know the influencer’s approximate figures

    Not everything is about the number of followers. There are many influencers who have a large number of followers but do not generate the desired engagement for our campaigns.

    Furthermore, depending on the action we want to carry out, our objective may be to reach a more niche audience, so the search for profiles with large numbers is not always the best.

    At SamyRoad we have our own tool for finding the right profiles, Shinebuzz, and we can find out the real effectiveness of these influencers and monitor the campaign from start to finish to find out the real efficiency of the campaign.

    Find out the real numbers of your campaign

    It is important to know the real interactions, views and impacts of the content generated during the campaign to really know if it has been effective. Influencer marketing must be, like traditional marketing, a marketing supported by data.

    To get to this type of information it is necessary to have help, through agencies or experts who are used to dealing with profiles, and also to understand how to read them.

    Need help with your influencer marketing campaign?

    At SamyRoad we have been working in influencer marketing for years, we have helped more than 200 brands and we have our own measurement and tracking tool to know the performance of different profiles, and to help you find the right ones.

    If you want to know more about the topic or how we can help you contact us.